Campbell Hausfeld air compressor parts are designed for quality and longevity. They are made by talented technicians and with each customer in mind.

The largest main components of a Campbell Hausfeld air compressor are the tank and the pump. Each of these has its own set of smaller parts that play a role in how your air compressor runs. Replace the oil and air filters every 1500 hours and the separator every 7500 hours to keep your machine working.

Follow along for a comprehensive list of Campbell Hausfeld air compressor parts and the purpose of each one!

Parts List for a Campbell Hausfeld HL550195 Air Compressor

Every part of an air compressor has an essential role. Here is a complete list of the Campbell Hausfeld HL550195 air compressor parts. 

The picture below will help you identify each one!

Diagram of a Campbell Hausfeld HL550195 Air Compressor

The Campbell Hausfeld HL550195 Air Compressor Parts List

Diagram CorrelationPart NamePart Number
12.5PHP OIL PUMPHL300000AV
2PUMP MOUNTING BOLTHL013000AV
3PUMP MOUNTING BOLTHL013000AV
4PUMP MOUNTING BOLTHL013000AV
5EXHAUST TUBEHL012700AV
6EAST START VALVEHL101900AV
7EASY START VALVE TEEHL009900AV
8PUMP HEAD SHROUDHL011100AV
9PUMP SHROUD SCREWHL012800AV
10MOTOR SHROUDHL011200AV
11MOTOR SHROUD SCREWHL012900AV
128-GALLON AIR TANKAR054000AV
13CHECK VALVECV307800AV
14TANK HANDLEHL010500AV
15TANK HANDLE SCREWSHL013100AV
16WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
17WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
18WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
19WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
20WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
21WHEEL KITHJ003800AV
22THUMB SCREW DRAIN COCKSR060513SV
23RUBBER FEET KITHL013300AV
24RUBBER FEET KITHL013300AV
25REGULATOR, ¼” MINIRE206900AV
26PRESSURE SWITCHCW212300AV
27PRESSURE GAUGEGA032000AV
28PRESSURE GAUGEGA032001AV
29SAFETY VALVE, 140 PSIV215100AV
30THRUST WASHERHS002100AV
31120V ST POWER CORDEC012601AV
32UNLOADER VALVECW212400AV
33BUSHING ADAPTERST071407AV
34NYLON TUBE, ¼” ODST117803AV
35STRAIN RELIEFCW212900AV
36STRAIN RELIEF CLAMP & SCREWCW212800AV

Main Parts of a Campbell Hausfeld Air Compressor

Knowing how to identify the parts of your Campbell Hausfeld air compressor is one thing; knowing what they do is another.

The main parts of a Campbell Hausfeld air compressor include:

  • Actuators
  • Bearings
  • Belts
  • Bumpers
  • Bushings
  • Connecting Rods
  • Couplings
  • Desiccant Dryers
  • Gaskets
  • Gauges
  • Motors
  • Piston
  • Pump
  • Rotors
  • Springs
  • Tanks
  • Valves

Actuators

This mechanism converts rotary or linear motion into pressurized air and sends it to tools or processes requiring compressed air as a power source.

Bearings

Heavy-duty industrial bearings guarantee a long service life for the toughest of tasks. Bearings are significantly impacted by adequate lubrication at the proper viscosity.

Belts

Belts are connected to the motor and ultimately determine the PSI of your compressor. When the motor runs, the belt moves the pump through pulleys.

Bumpers

The valves are guarded by valve bumpers, which keep them from being inadvertently struck.

Bushings

Bushings separate other moving parts inside the air compressor. They allow for protection against costly breakdowns while minimizing rocking.

Connecting Rods

The connecting rods, which are used to lift and lower the piston in the crankcase, must endure a significant amount of abuse. They are an important component of your air compressor’s lifespan.

Couplings

These are like anti-leak gaskets that are used on internal components to prevent high-pressure leaks.

Desiccant Dryers

These machines purify compressed air by reducing and dispelling water vapor.

Gaskets

To ensure optimum airflow and pressure, your air compressor should be air-tight with effective seals and gaskets. Gaskets may be found in a variety of places on your machine, like the oil and air tank.

It’s essential that every inch of your air compressor be completely “air-tight” to prevent leaks and other maintenance issues.

Gauges

Typically there are two gauges on an air compressor- the tank gauge and the regulator gauge. The tank gauge monitors the PSIs in the compressor air tank, while the regulator gauge shows the pressure of the regulator (which can be adjusted by you).

The average PSI of an air tank should be around 80 PSI for smaller tools and 110 PSI for larger pieces of equipment.

Motors

The motor is one of the most integral parts of an air compressor. Different compressors require different sizes of motors, depending on the job they need to do.

The motor converts electrical energy into motion (or kinetic energy). It’s responsible for propelling the piston up and down within the compressor’s cylinder.

Piston

This is a component of piston air compressors. The piston works by moving in an upward and downward motion to control the flow of air.

 

When it goes up, it draws air into the cylinder, then the largest disc folds downward, which allows the air to pass. When the piston moves back up, the large disc seals against the valve seat and blocks the flow of air.

Pump

The pump and the air tank are the two largest structures in an air compressor; however, the pump is probably the most important. This is because it’s the main functional component.

The pump is responsible for moving liquid or gas (in this case, compressed air) from one place to another. There are two different types: reciprocating and rotary.

Reciprocating pumps move side-to-side to pump air while rotary pumps spin clockwise.

Rotors

In rotary screw air compressors, assembly consists of two interlocking helical rotors that compress the air coming in through the inlet valve.

Rotors rotate incredibly fast to create a system that air travels through. Then it gets compressed and dispelled from the air compressor.

Springs

Many parts of your compressor rely on springs to work properly. For example, the springs on a safety relief valve are specifically designed to release when the pressure is too much for the compressor to handle.

When the springs are old or not working properly, the entire system will suffer. Be sure to perform regular maintenance checks to prevent this.

Tank

The receiver tank of an air compressor is the second most important component within the machine. It’s also possible for you to connect a secondary receiver tank to your device to allow for a longer run time.

Receiver tanks are what store the compressed air to be applied to your power tools and enable the machine to run even after it’s turned off.

Tanks need to be sealed off and leak-free to power your system properly!

Valves

Air compressor check valves keep your air “in check” by making sure the air is only able to flow in one direction: out.

 

Regular Maintenance of a Campbell Hausfeld Air Compressor

There are a few things to take note of that will require regular maintenance and checkups.

The following things need to be replaced or maintained every so often:

  • Air Tank Filter
  • Oil Filter
  • Separators

Air Tank Filters

These help keep contaminants out of your air compressor system so that everything runs smoothly.

Air tank filters should be replaced about every 1500 hours of use. You can easily purchase replacements from your local handy store or online. Industrial filters cost about $40 each, while smaller air compressor filters are $10 for a pack of 4.

Oil Filter

Oil filters are also a huge part of keeping your machine clean and lubricated.

Oil filters have the same lifespan as air filters- 1500 hours. Purchase a replacement for around $25.

Separators

Internal oil-water separators do exactly what they sound like- keep the water and oil separate inside your air compressor machine.

Separators last a bit longer than filters for around 7500 hours of use. A new separator is also more expensive to replace than a filter. Buy a replacement for $200, depending on the model of your compressor.

Where Is the Model Number on a Campbell Hausfeld Air Compressor?

The model number is important to locate on your air compressor. This enables you to buy replacement parts, troubleshoot the system, and perform the appropriate level of maintenance.

The model number on a Campbell Hausfeld air compressor is located on the sticker of the air tank. 

 

See the picture below for how to find this:

Related Guides

The Conclusion

When it comes to air compressors, the tank and pump are where all of the magic happens. Tanks hold the compressed air for storage, while the pump creates the compression.

There are a few parts within Campbell Hausfeld compressors that need to be maintained on a regular basis. This includes oil filters, air filters for catching debris, and separators to keep water and oil out of your turbines.

The best way to make sure your machine is running at its peak level? A little preventative maintenance (every 1500 hours for oil or air filter changes, every 7500 hours for separator replacements).

Check out the comprehensive Campbell Hausfeld air compressor parts list above to help troubleshoot your piece of equipment!